Sunday, April 24, 2016

The Bible - Session 7

Is the Bible the truly God's Word?  Christians say yes.  The question we must ask ourselves is how can we know that the Bible is the Word of God and not just a good book? What is unique about the Bible that sets it apart from all other religious books ever written? Is there any evidence that the Bible is truly God’s Word?   These types of questions must be seriously examined if we are to determine the validity of the Bible’s claim to be the very Word of God, divinely inspired, and totally sufficient for all matters of faith and practice. The Church of Divine Guidance Adult Bible Study Group is doing a study to address and answer these questions.  

Review
The bible is constructed in two main parts.  The Old Testament, or God’s covenant with man and specifically Israel before the birth of Christ, and the New Testament or covenant after His birth.  
The old Testament has three major sections, history, poetry, and prophecy.  
The Historical Books:  Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 & 2 Samuel, 1 & 2 Kings, 1 & 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther.  
Those books trace the history of man from creation through  the time that the nation of Israel is chosen, starting with Abraham, redeemed, and prepared to enter a promised homeland; they record the history of the Jewish nation from its inception through its days of glory and deportation, and finally, to its days of survival as a small, insignificant nation surrounded by enemies intent on destroying it.
The Poetic Books:  Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon  


Through the use of Hebrew poetry, they delve into the questions of suffering, wisdom, life, love, and most importantly, the character and nature of God. The Psalms do however have some prophecies about the coming Messiah.


The Prophetic Books:  Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi


The prophetic books have four major themes and purposes:
1. To expose the sinful practices of the people
2. To call the people back to the moral, civil, and ceremonial law of God
3. To warn the people of coming judgment
4. To anticipate the coming of Messiah


Why is the Old Testament and the history of the Jews so important to us as Christians?  
  1. It reveals God—that there is a Creator, that the world didn't just happen, and that He is in control over everything at all times.
  2. It reveals that this God is a God of love who is deeply concerned about every person.   
  3. It reveals that God's love is defined by His laws.  The Ten Commandments, and the statutes and judgments based on those commandments, show us how to live God's way of love.  All of them are summed up by the two great laws of love that Jesus gave the in answer to a question from one of the scribes about which was the greatest commandment
  4. It reveals that sin brings suffering—that when we sin, there is a penalty. And if an entire nation sins, it eventually will reap the results of those sins. On the other hand, if an individual or a nation repents of sin and asks God for forgiveness, He is ready and willing to forgive
  5. It reveals the plan of God—that there would be a Savior who would pay the death penalty for your sins and my sins; that this Savior, the Messiah, would establish the Kingdom of God on earth; and that there would be a resurrection of the dead to eternal life
The entire 53rd chapter of Isaiah
6. It reveals that there would be a new covenant under which God would give people the gift of His Spirit, - which would remove our heart of stone and replace it with a heart that would love and obey God
Jeremiah 31:31-34 (HCSB)31  “Look, the days are coming”—⌊this is⌋ the LORD’s declaration—“when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and with the house of Judah.32  ⌊This one will⌋ not be like the covenant I made with their ancestors when I took them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt—a covenant they broke even though I had married them”—the LORD’s declaration.33  “Instead, this is the covenant I will make with the house of Israel after those days”—the LORD’s declaration. “I will put My teaching within them and write it on their hearts. I will be their God, and they will be My people.34  No longer will one teach his neighbor or his brother, saying, ‘Know the LORD,’ for they will all know Me, from the least to the greatest of them”—⌊this is⌋ the LORD’s declaration. “For I will forgive their wrongdoing and never again remember their sin.”
7.  It reveals that humanity is created in God's image,-  created to be like Him and to share rulership with God over the entire universe
Genesis 1:26-27 (HCSB)26  Then God said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness. They will rule the fish of the sea, the birds of the sky, the livestock, all the earth, and the creatures that crawl on the earth.”27  So God created man in His own image; He created him in the image of God; He created them male and female.
The New Testament is made up of historical books
4 biographies of Jesus then the early history of the church in Acts which provides a factual report of the period from Christ's final words to His followers and His ascension into heaven to the travels and trials of the apostle Paul. Acts describes some of the key events in the spread of the gospel from Judea to the far reaches of the Roman Empire.
The Historical Books:  Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, Acts
The Doctrinal Books:  Romans, 1&2 Corinthians, Galatians, Philippians, Colossians, 1 & 2 Thessalonians, 1&2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon, Hebrews, James, 1 & 2 Peter, 1, 2 & 3 John, Jude, Revelation


With the end of Acts and the historical books of the New Testament, the Bible moves to 22 letters (called epistles are letters of doctrine—teaching and instruction in Christian truth and practice.


Who Decided Which Books Should Be In the Bible
A canon is a list of texts (or "books") which a particular religious community regards as authoritative scripture. The word "canon" comes from the Greek “kanwn”, meaning "rule" or "measuring stick".
Bible Canon(s)
How was the biblical canon developed?
Old Testament
The term “canon” is used to describe the books that are divinely inspired and therefore belong in the Bible. Determining the canon was a process conducted first by Jewish rabbis and scholars and later by early Christians. Ultimately, it was God who decided what books belonged in the biblical canon. It was simply a matter of God’s convincing His human followers which books should be included in the Bible.

Compared to the New Testament, there was much less controversy over the canon of the Old Testament. Hebrew believers recognized God’s messengers and accepted their writings as inspired of God. By A.D. 250 there was nearly universal agreement on the canon of Hebrew Scripture.  That is what has become what Christians call the Old Testament.  
Outside the Israel some Jews included twelve to fifteen other books as part of Scripture. The Septuagint,  which is a translation of the Hebrew Bible and some related texts into Greek (also called the Greek Old Testament), which was translated in Egypt, contains books that we now call the Apocrypha. (Apocrypha means “those hidden away.”) Early Christians differed over whether these extra books should be considered Scripture or not. Those nearest Israel tended to exclude them. Those closer to Rome tended to include them.
The vast majority of Hebrew scholars considered the Apocrypha to be good historical and religious documents, but not on the same level as the Hebrew Scriptures.
Apocrypha
1 Esdras, 2 Esdras, Additions to Esther, 1 Macabees, 2 Macabees, Tobias, Judith, Wisdom, Sirach, Baruch, Epistle of Jeremiah, Susanna, Prayer of Azariah, Prayer of Manasseh, Bel and the Dragon, Laodiceans
In some Protestant Bibles, they are placed between the New and Old Testament. In the Roman Catholic Bibles the books are interspersed with the rest of the text.

During the sixteenth-century Reformation, Martin Luther spoke strongly against the Apocrypha. In reaction the Roman Catholic Church convened a council in Trent (now in Italy), where they declared the Apocrypha to be canonical. To this day Catholics and Protestants disagree on this issue. Catholics uphold the Apocrypha. Protestants believe that the Apocrypha is useful but not inspired.
The Protestant Old Testament consists of the same books as the Hebrew Bible, but the order and division of the books are different. Protestants number the Old Testament books at 39, while Judaism numbers the same books as 24. This is because Judaism considers Samuel, Kings, and Chronicles to form one book each, groups the 12 minor prophets into one book, and also considers Ezra and Nehemiah a single book.
There is no scholarly consensus as to when the Hebrew Bible canon was fixed: some scholars argue that it was fixed sometime between 140-40 BCE), while others argue it was not fixed until the second century CE or even later.
Michael Barber says that the earliest and most explicit testimony of a Hebrew canonical list comes from Jewish historian Josephus (37CE – c. 100CE).  He wrote about a canon used by Jews in the first century AD.
New Testament
For the New Testament, the process of the recognition and collection began in the first centuries of the Christian church.
Very early on, some of the New Testament books were being recognized.
The books of the canon of the New Testament were written mostly in the first century and finished by the year 150 AD.
Paul considered Luke’s writings to be as authoritative as the Old Testament
1 Timothy 5:18 (HCSB)18  For the Scripture says: Do not muzzle an ox while it is treading out the grain, and, the worker is worthy of his wages.  
Which is from Luke 10:7 as something that Jesus said
Luke 10:1-7 (HCSB)1  After this, the Lord appointed 70 others, and He sent them ahead of Him in pairs to every town and place where He Himself was about to go.2  He told them: “The harvest is abundant, but the workers are few. Therefore, pray to the Lord of the harvest to send out workers into His harvest.3  Now go; I’m sending you out like lambs among wolves.4  Don’t carry a money-bag, traveling bag, or sandals; don’t greet anyone along the road.5  Whatever house you enter, first say, ‘Peace to this household.’6  If a son of peace is there, your peace will rest on him; but if not, it will return to you.7  Remain in the same house, eating and drinking what they offer, for the worker is worthy of his wages. Don’t be moving from house to house.  
Jesus was quoting from Deuteronomy
Deuteronomy 25:4 (HCSB)4  “Do not muzzle an ox while it treads out grain.
Peter recognized Paul’s writings as Scripture
2 Peter 3:15-16 (HCSB)15  Also, regard the patience of our Lord as ⌊an opportunity for⌋ salvation, just as our dear brother Paul has written to you according to the wisdom given to him.16  He speaks about these things in all his letters in which there are some matters that are hard to understand. The untaught and unstable twist them to their own destruction, as they also do with the rest of the Scriptures.  
Some of the books (epistles) of the New Testament were being circulated among the churches.
Colossians 4:16 (HCSB)16  When this letter has been read among you, have it read also in the church of the Laodiceans; and see that you also read the letter from Laodicea.
We still have the letter to the Colossians. The letter to the Laodiceans was not considered inspired or pertinent enough to be preserved.
1 Thessalonians 5:27 (HCSB)27  I charge you by the Lord that this letter be read to all the brothers.
Wherever Christianity spread, Christians gathered for worship and instruction. In keeping with the customs of the Jewish synagogue, a portion of Old Testament Scripture would be read and explained. Meanwhile, the apostles, along with other evangelists and teachers, traveled from place to place to plant churches and encourage believers.
As need arose, the apostles wrote letters to various churches. When a letter arrived, it was read with great excitement in the worship service. Often the letter would be copied and shared with neighboring churches, who, in turn, would share it with still other churches. Naturally, the more inspiring letters were copied and shared more often.

Around A.D. 150, Justin Martyr who was an apologist and very important in the early church.  (An Apologist is someone who defends or supports something such as a religion, cause, or organization that is being criticized or attacked by other people).

He described worship in the early church this way:

On the day called the Day of the Sun all who live in cities or in the country gather together to one place, and the memoirs of the apostles or the writings of the prophets are read, as long as time permits; then, when the reader has ceased, the president verbally instructs, and exhorts to the imitation of these good things. Then all rise together and pray.
By this early date, “the memoirs of the apostles” were considered as important to the teaching of the church as the writings of the prophets.
From the very first the authority of Jesus had full recognition in all the Christian world. The whole work of the apostles was in interpreting Him to the growing church. His sayings and His life were in part for the illumination of the Old Testament; wholly for the understanding of life and its issues.
Clement of Rome mentioned at least eight New Testament books (A.D. 95).  After Paul and Peter were martyred at Rome, Clement become a leader, in fact, bishop, of the church there. He may be the person mentioned in Philippians.
Philippians 4:3 (NKJV)3  And I urge you also, true companion, help these women who labored with me in the gospel, with Clement also, and the rest of my fellow workers, whose names are in the Book of Life.
Ignatius of Antioch who was the Bishop of Antioch after Peter and someone named Saint Evodius (who died around AD 67)  acknowledged about seven books (A.D. 115). The historian Eusebius records that Ignatius succeeded Evodius.
There is another guy named Polycarp, who was a disciple of John.  He acknowledged 15 books (A.D. 108).
Later, Irenaeus, who was a disciple of Polycarp mentioned 21 books (A.D. 185).  
Hippolytus was the most important 3rd-century theologian in the Christian Church in Rome recognized 22 books (A.D. 170-235).
The first “canon” was the Muratorian Canon, which was compiled in AD 170. The Muratorian Canon included all of the New Testament books except Hebrews, James, and 3 John. In AD 363, the Council of Laodicea stated that only the Old Testament (along with one book of the Apocrypha) and 26 books of the New Testament (everything but Revelation) were canonical and to be read in the churches. The Council of Hippo (AD 393) and the Council of Carthage (AD 397) also affirmed the same 27 books as authoritative.

The concept we have today of a completed Bible was formulated early in the history of the church. By the end of the second century all but seven books (Hebrews, 2 and 3 John, 2 Peter, Jude, James, and Revelation) were recognized as apostolic, and by the end of the fourth century all twenty-seven books in our present canon were recognized by all the churches of the West. After the Damasine Council of Rome in A.D. 332 and the third Council of Carthage in A.D. 397 the question of the Canon was closed in the West.
The Catholic Church made dogmatic definition upon its Biblical canon at the Council of Trent of 1546, reaffirmed the Canons of Florence of 1442 and North African Councils (Hippo and Carthage) of 393-419.[2][3] For the Church of England, it was made dogmatic on the Thirty-Nine Articles of 1563; for Calvinism, on the Westminster Confession of Faith of 1647.
Protestants point to the following four "Criteria for Canonicity" to justify the selection of the books that have been included in the New Testament—though these ideas aren't isolated to Protestant theology, but extend to or are derived from other Christian traditions:

Apostolic Origin — attributed to and based upon the preaching/teaching of the first-generation apostles (or their close companions).
Universal Acceptance — acknowledged by all major Christian communities in the ancient world (by the end of the 4th century) as well as accepted canon by Jewish authorities (for the Old Testament).
Liturgical Use — read publicly when early Christian communities gathered for the Lord's Supper (their weekly worship services).
Consistent Message — containing a theological outlook similar to or complementary to other accepted Christian writings.[49]
In practice, most Protestants hold to the Hebrew Bible for the Old Testament and the Roman Catholic canon for the New Testament.
Again, it is crucial to remember that the church did not determine the canon. No early church council decided on the canon. It was God, and God alone, who determined which books belonged in the Bible. It was simply a matter of God’s imparting to His followers what He had already decided. The human process of collecting the books of the Bible was flawed, but God, in His sovereignty, and despite our ignorance and stubbornness, brought the early church to the recognition of the books He had inspired.
Theologians are careful to note that the church didn’t develop the canon, God did that by inspiring its writing and superintending each book’s preservation. The church recognized the canon by experience and mutual agreement.

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Sunday, April 17, 2016

The Bible Session 6

Is the Bible the truly God's Word?  Christians say yes.  The question we must ask ourselves is how can we know that the Bible is the Word of God and not just a good book? What is unique about the Bible that sets it apart from all other religious books ever written? Is there any evidence that the Bible is truly God’s Word?   These types of questions must be seriously examined if we are to determine the validity of the Bible’s claim to be the very Word of God, divinely inspired, and totally sufficient for all matters of faith and practice. The Church of Divine Guidance Adult Bible Study Group is doing a study to address and answer these questions.  

Review  



Last week we started to look at the way that the Old Testament was constructed.


The Old Testament was written,for the most part,  in Hebrew, which is a comparatively simple language to understand.  It’s broken up into 3 major sections; history, poetry, and prophecy.   The historical books are the first 17 books in the Old Testament.  The first 5 are known as the Pentateuch or the Law.  Those books trace the history of man from creation through  the time that the nation of Israel is chosen, starting with Abraham, redeemed, and prepared to enter a promised homeland.  The remaining 12 historical books record the conquest of that land, a transition period in which judges ruled over the nation, the formation of the kingdom, and the division of that kingdom into northern (Israel) and southern (Judah) kingdoms, and finally the destruction and captivity of both kingdoms.   They record the history of the Jewish nation from its inception through its days of glory and deportation, and finally, to its days of survival as a small, insignificant nation surrounded by enemies intent on destroying it.
The Historical Books:  Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 & 2 Samuel, 1 & 2 Kings, 1 & 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther.  
The Poetic Books:  Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon  


Now comes a different set of books, which are known as the poetic books of the Bible: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon. They don't relate historical experiences.  Rather they relate the experiences of the human heart. They do not advance the story of the nation of Israel. Instead, through the use of Hebrew poetry, they delve into the questions of suffering, wisdom, life, love, and most importantly, the character and nature of God. The Psalms do however have some prophecies about the coming Messiah.  


The next major section of the Old Testament is prophecy.


The Prophetic Books:  Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi


These 17 books make up  about one-fourth of the Scriptures.  The office of prophet was instituted the days of Samuel, and those who were prophets stood along with the priests as God's special representatives. The men who wrote these books were called or appointed to "speak for" God Himself. God communicated His messages to them through a variety of means, including dreams, visions, angels, nature, miracles, and an audible voice.


A prophet’s primary function in the Old Testament (OT) was to serve as God’s representative or ambassador by communicating God’s word to his people. True prophets never spoke on their own authority or shared their personal opinions, but rather delivered the message God himself gave them.
Exodus 4:12 (NKJV)12  Now therefore, go, and I will be with your mouth and teach you what you
Jeremiah 1:9 (NKJV)9  Then the LORD put forth His hand and touched my mouth, and the LORD said to me: "Behold, I have put My words in your mouth.
Ezekiel 2:7 (NKJV)7  You shall speak My words to them, whether they hear or whether they refuse, for they are rebellious.
And many of the OT prophetic books begin with the words, “The word of the LORD that came to whoever the prophet was.
The prophetic books have four major themes and purposes:


1. To expose the sinful practices of the people
2. To call the people back to the moral, civil, and ceremonial law of God
3. To warn the people of coming judgment
4. To anticipate the coming of Messiah


Unfortunately, the messages they shared from God were often rejected and their lives endangered.


Why is the Old Testament and the history of the Jews so important to us as Christians?  
Both Jews and Christians both claim to have God's Word.
Judaism. It is the oldest of the world's three great monotheistic religions (that is, religions serving one God). He revealed His law, the Torah, to the Jewish people (the first five books of the Old Testament) and He chose them to be a light for all humanity. The Torah contains some 613 commands which are summed up in the Ten Commandments.
A very important concept in Judaism is that of the Messiah. Originally the Jews believed that God would send a powerful messenger (the Messiah) who would deliver Israel from her oppressors and usher in a reign of peace and prosperity. Today many Jews no longer hold to a personal messiah, but hope for a messianic age of justice and truth. For the Jews the coming of the Messiah or the messianic age still lies in the future.
We Christians all owe a tremendous debt to the Jews. We have inherited so much from them, and from them came God's own Son, the Messiah. Faith in Him, that is, in His death and resurrection is why we are now reconciled to God and have hope for the future, the resurrection of the body and eternal life in the presence of God. We Christians can not only look back on a marvelous history, but forward to the day when His kingdom comes and brings all people together.  
So the Hebrew bible most if which is the Old Testament is very important because;
  1. It reveals God—that there is a Creator, that the world didn't just happen, and that He is in control over everything at all times.
We read about creation in Genesis 1
Isaiah 46:9-10 (HCSB)9  Remember what happened long ago, for I am God, and there is no other; ⌊I am⌋ God, and no one is like Me.10  I declare the end from the beginning, and from long ago what is not yet done, saying: My plan will take place, and I will do all My will.
  1. It reveals that this God is a God of love who is deeply concerned about every person.   
Psalm 8:4-8 (HCSB)4  what is man that You remember him, the son of man that You look after him?5  You made him little less than God and crowned him with glory and honor.6  You made him lord over the works of Your hands; You put everything under his feet:7  all the sheep and oxen, as well as the animals in the wild,8  the birds of the sky, and the fish of the sea that pass through the currents of the seas.
Psalm 86:5 (HCSB)5  For You, Lord, are kind and ready to forgive, rich in faithful love to all who call on You.
Psalm 100:5 (HCSB)5  For Yahweh is good, and His love is eternal; His faithfulness endures through all generations.
  1. It reveals that God's love is defined by His laws.  The Ten Commandments, and the statutes and judgments based on those commandments, show us how to live God's way of love.  All of them are summed up by the two great laws of love that Jesus gave the in answer to a question from one of the scribes about which was the greatest commandment
Mark 12:29-31 (HCSB)29  “This is the most important,” Jesus answered: Listen, Israel! The Lord our God, the Lord is One.30  Love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength.31  “The second is: Love your neighbor as yourself. There is no other command greater than these.”
  1. It reveals that sin brings suffering—that when we sin, there is a penalty. And if an entire nation sins, it eventually will reap the results of those sins. On the other hand, if an individual or a nation repents of sin and asks God for forgiveness, He is ready and willing to forgive
Deuteronomy 28:15-68 gives us a litany of the result of sin.  It’s talking about the nation of Israel but we can apply much of it to ourselves as individuals and as a nation.
But then when we or a nation repents and asks forgiveness;
Psalm 103:8-13 (HCSB)8  The LORD is compassionate and gracious, slow to anger and rich in faithful love.9  He will not always accuse ⌊us⌋ or be angry forever.10  He has not dealt with us as our sins deserve or repaid us according to our offenses.11  For as high as the heavens are above the earth, so great is His faithful love toward those who fear Him.12  As far as the east is from the west, so far has He removed our transgressions from us.13  As a father has compassion on his children, so the LORD has compassion on those who fear Him.
  1. It reveals the plan of God—that there would be a Savior who would pay the death penalty for your sins and my sins; that this Savior, the Messiah, would establish the Kingdom of God on earth; and that there would be a resurrection of the dead to eternal life
The entire 53rd chapter of Isaiah
Daniel 2:44 (HCSB)44  “In the days of those kings, the God of heaven will set up a kingdom that will never be destroyed, and this kingdom will not be left to another people. It will crush all these kingdoms and bring them to an end, but will itself endure forever.  
Micah 5:2 (NKJV)2  "But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, Though you are little among the thousands of Judah, Yet out of you shall come forth to Me The One to be Ruler in Israel, Whose goings forth are from of old, From everlasting."
Numbers 24:17 (NKJV)17  "I see Him, but not now; I behold Him, but not near; A Star shall come out of Jacob; A Scepter shall rise out of Israel, And batter the brow of Moab, And destroy all the sons of tumult.  
  1. It reveals that there would be a new covenant under which God would give people the gift of His Spirit, which would remove our heart of stone and replace it with a heart that would love and obey God
Jeremiah 31:31-34 (HCSB)31  “Look, the days are coming”—⌊this is⌋ the LORD’s declaration—“when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and with the house of Judah.32  ⌊This one will⌋ not be like the covenant I made with their ancestors when I took them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt—a covenant they broke even though I had married them”—the LORD’s declaration.33  “Instead, this is the covenant I will make with the house of Israel after those days”—the LORD’s declaration. “I will put My teaching within them and write it on their hearts. I will be their God, and they will be My people.34  No longer will one teach his neighbor or his brother, saying, ‘Know the LORD,’ for they will all know Me, from the least to the greatest of them”—⌊this is⌋ the LORD’s declaration. “For I will forgive their wrongdoing and never again remember their sin.”
Ezekiel 36:26-27 (HCSB)26  I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit within you; I will remove your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh.27  I will place My Spirit within you and cause you to follow My statutes and carefully observe My ordinances.
  1. It reveals that humanity is created in God's image, created to be like Him and to share rulership with God over the entire universe
Genesis 1:26-27 (HCSB)26  Then God said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness. They will rule the fish of the sea, the birds of the sky, the livestock, all the earth, and the creatures that crawl on the earth.”27  So God created man in His own image; He created him in the image of God; He created them male and female.
Hebrews 2:6-8 (HCSB)6  But one has somewhere testified: What is man that You remember him, or the son of man that You care for him?7  You made him lower than the angels for a short time; You crowned him with glory and honor8  and subjected everything under his feet. For in subjecting everything to him, He left nothing that is not subject to him. As it is, we do not yet see everything subjected to him.  
The New Testament
Early New Testament Manuscript
Was written in Greek, which is a very complex language that emphasizes abstract concepts and subtle shades of meaning. Therefore, studying the New Testament demands greater diligence.  Like the Old Testament, the New Testament is not one book, but a collection of 27 individual books that reflect a wide range of themes, literary forms, and purposes
The Historical Books:  Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, Acts
The first five books in the New Testament—Matthew, Mark, Luke, John (called the Gospels), and Acts (Luke wrote Acts too)—are entirely narrative and the only historical books in the New Testament. The first the Gospels, are a historical account of the life and times of Jesus Christ, the Messiah, whose birth, life, death, and resurrection were prophesied throughout the Old Testament. The book of Acts provides a factual report of the period from Christ's final words to His followers and His ascension into heaven to the travels and trials of the apostle Paul. Acts describes some of the key events in the spread of the gospes from Judea to the far reaches of the Roman Empire.
The Doctrinal Books:  Romans, 1&2 Corinthians, Galatians, Philippians, Colossians, 1 & 2 Thessalonians, 1&2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon, Hebrews, James, 1 & 2 Peter, 1, 2 & 3 John, Jude, Revelation


With the end of Acts and the historical books of the New Testament, the Bible moves to 22 letters (called epistles are letters of doctrine—teaching and instruction in Christian truth and practice.  A doctrine is a belief or set of beliefs held and taught by a church, political party, or other group.


Paul is believed to be the writer of Romans, 1&2 Corinthians, Galatians, Philippians, Colossians, 1&2 Thessalonians, 1&2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon, James, the brother of Jesus wrote James, the apostle Peter wrote the books by his name, the apostle John wrote, in addition to the Gospel book, wrote the 3 epistles with his name and he wrote the book of Revelation.   Jude, which we studied a few months ago, was believed to be written by another half brother of Jesus and the brother of James.  There is some dispute about the author of Hebrews.  Most theologians believe that it was written by Paul.  

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Prayer Warrior: Praying Your Way To Victory - Session 12 - See What's Happening From God Perspective

The Church of Divine Guidance Sunday Morning Adult Bible Study Group is going through Prayer Warrior The Power Of Praying Your Way T...